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Jean-Baptiste Camille Corot Oil Painting Reproductions

Corot, Jean-Baptiste Camille

A Flood

Corot, Jean-Baptiste Camille

A Peasant Woman

Corot, Jean-Baptiste Camille

A Road Near Arras

Corot, Jean-Baptiste Camille

A Village Steeet, Dardagny

Corot, Jean-Baptiste Camille

A Wagon in the Plains of Artois

Corot, Jean-Baptiste Camille

A Woman Gathering Faggots at Ville-d’Avray

Corot, Jean-Baptiste Camille

Agostina

Corot, Jean-Baptiste Camille

An Orchard at Harvest Time

Corot, Jean-Baptiste Camille

Aqueduct

Corot, Jean-Baptiste Camille

Avignon from the West

Corot, Jean-Baptiste Camille

Bacchante by the Sea

Corot, Jean-Baptiste Camille

Banks of a River

Corot, Jean-Baptiste Camille

Breton Woman With Her Little Girl

Corot, Jean-Baptiste Camille

Breton Women at the Fountain

Corot, Jean-Baptiste Camille

Canal in Picardi

Corot, Jean-Baptiste Camille

Chartres Cathedral

Corot, Jean-Baptiste Camille

Cow in a Stable

Corot, Jean-Baptiste Camille

Cowherd and Her Child

Corot, Jean-Baptiste Camille

Cowherd in a Clearing Near a Pond

Corot, Jean-Baptiste Camille

Cows in a Marshy Landscape

Corot, Jean-Baptiste Camille

Crecy-en-Brie Road in the Country

Corot, Jean-Baptiste Camille

Dardagny, Morning


Jean-Baptiste Camille Corot Paintings

Jean-Baptiste Camille Corot was a French landscape painter. Corot was the leading painter of the Barbizon school of France in the mid-nineteenth century. He is a pivotal figure in landscape painting: His work simultaneously references the Neo-Classical tradition and anticipates the plein-air innovations of Impressionism. Of him Claude Monet exclaimed "There is only one master here, Corot. We are nothing compared to him, nothing. "His contributions to figure painting are hardly less important; Edgar Degas preferred his figures to his landscapes, and the classical figures of Pablo Picasso pay overt homage to Corot's influence.

In addition to the landscapes, of which he painted several hundred (so popular was the late style that there exist at least as many forgeries), Corot produced a number of prized figure pictures. These were mostly studio pieces, executed probably with a view to keep his hand in with severe drawing, rather than with the intention of producing pictures for the marketplace. Yet many of them are fine compositions, and in all cases the colour is remarkable for its strength and purity. Corot also executed many etchings and pencil sketches.

Corot learned little from his masters. He visited Italy on three occasions, and two of his Roman studies hang in the Louvre. A regular contributor to the Salon, in 1846 the French government decorated him with the cross of the Legion of Honour, and he was promoted to an officer in 1867. His many friends considered, nevertheless, that he was officially neglected, and in 1874, a short time before his death, they presented him with a gold medal. He died in Paris and was buried at Père Lachaise.

A number of followers called themselves Corot's pupils. The best known are Eugene-Louis Boudin, Lepine, Chintreuil, Français, Le Roux and DeFaux. During the last few years of his life he earned large sums with his pictures, which were in great demand. In 1871 he gave £2000 for the poor of Paris, under siege by the Prussians. During the actual Paris Commune he was at Arras with Alfred Robaut. In 1872 he bought a house in Auvers as a gift for Honoré Daumier, who by then was blind, without resources, and homeless. In 1875 he donnated 10.000 francs to the widow of Millet in support of her children. His charity was near proverbial. He also financially supported the keep of a daycenter for children, rue Vandrezanne in Paris. The works of Corot are housed in museums in France and the Netherlands, Britain and America.